My #1 Ubuntu issue: running out of boot space

About once a quarter I have to visit the discussion and answers at How do I free up more space in /boot?. I should probably just note this here, for reference:

dpkg -l linux-{image,headers}-"[0-9]*" | awk '/^ii/{ print $2}' | grep -v -euname -r | cut -f1,2 -d”-“` | grep -e ‘[0-9]’ | xargs sudo apt-get -y purge

I’ve run into this issue across multiple installs, for years! I’ve tried default partitioning, and various custom setups, but I am not sure it is the size of /boot that is the problem.

I’ve tracked a few bugs on Launchpad, but nothing conclusive has been done, because I am still dealing with this. Ideally, upon running a new kernel, the older versions would be auto-removed.

Recording this now, so I can track my own spiral into despair. ^_^

What does MailChimp infer about you?

I got a message about MailChimp including pre-built segments for customer use. The demographics segments are as follows: Male, Female, Under the Age of 35, Over the Age of 35.

I don’t like that. I spend enough time avoiding labels and being marketed to. I want out. So I am unsubscribing from any lists hosted by MailChimp. I know it won’t make much of an impact, but that is one less “vendor” I will worry about tracking me for marketers.

List A

Open notebook with my dreams and aspirations listed; most are rejected with an x.

Reading a post on how to think about one’s career, I came upon a story of how Warren Buffet encouraged an employee to focus on career goals. It sounded like amazing advice to me, probably in part because it is similar to a KonMari method for your goals, and I am currently applying that to my physical belongings.

The abbreviated version of Buffet’s focus method is this: create a list your 25 most important career goals. Then determine the 5 most important of those. Now you have two lists. The items on the short list are your focus; the items on the longer list must be avoided at all costs, until the items on the short list are accomplished.

That makes so much sense to me, because my brain spends 99% of its energy keeping all of my plans and goals in active memory.

I guess I am looking for something in purging myself of non-essentials, so I got to work making my list. Here are my five career goals:

  • Blog every day for a year – this will challenge me to further hone my voice, and give me the practice I need to reach some other life goals that didn’t make the cut, such as publishing non-fiction books and a series of fiction. Also, the more I write the easier everything in my life is, I’ve noticed.
  • Generate $6,000 a month from my hosting business – I am halfway there, but spending a year working at a startup curtailed my growth here, so I’d like to double-down and focus on the work I am doing there.
  • Produce a podcast – I am enamored with podcasts. It hits all the points for me: I can retain more, review faster, and digest in more contexts (such as being a pedestrian, or doing light tasks). I will need to tone this down, or just go nuts and create a maiki show, but I’d like to learn and produce this form of media.
  • Create a job network – This has been on my mind for a while, and it rose to the top of my various web ideas. Of course as a freelancer creating a job network is very advantageous, but I actually think I can make this a better experience for everyone involved.
  • Hold business hours – At Impact Hub Oakland there is this thing called, “business hours”. Members dedicate time each week to speak with other members one on one as an expert in their field. I do not want to do this. I mean, I do, but I really don’t. I will explain in a future post. I think by accomplishing this I will level up a particular skillset.

I already feel a burden lift off my chest. But my brain knows that it won’t be able to not think about the other 20+ things on the list (it was way too easy for me to list those initially).

I am going to try another method I learned that Hillary Clinton uses (the method is described in this Vox video on YouTube at around 6:36), by which she takes notes on little scraps of paper and stuffs them in a suitcases, and every few months would gather her staff and they would go through them and piece together the notes to create meaningful policy decisions. I plan to adapt that to externalizing my memory so I can focus on my immediate goals, but still capture the ideas and narratives that spring into mind.